howtofightwrite
One thing I’ve said in terms of the word likable, and Netflix got mad at me for saying it: Fuck likability. I don’t give two shits if someone likes my characters. I do care whether they’re attracted to them. And there’s a big difference. I don’t mean sexually attracted. I mean attracted so that you can’t keep your eyes off them, you’re invested in them. He’s not likable, but you have to know where he ends up, you have to follow his path. I’m interested in the tension where one moment you might like them and the next you abhor them, or maybe simultaneously.

Beau Willimon, screenwriter for House of Cards, in a panel discussion covered by The Atlantic.

This is what I mean when I say characters don’t have to be “likable”, but they do have to be “sympathetic” (the word sympathisch in German has a slightly different meaning from our “sympathetic”, so I think that’s why I choose that term over another one, such as “attractive”). How else would a character like Humbert Humbert be a protagonist?

(via yeahwriters)

strawberries-in-december

Italy. What happens if you ask a “Pepperoni Pizza”

italiansreclaimingitaly:

youneedasoultraveller:

elligranka:

firmine:

enghurrd:

Expectation:

image

Reality:

image

Pepperoni => Peperoni = Peppers

Stop arguing with the waiter that “THIS IS NOT THE PIZZA THAT I WANTED!” because it’s your fault.

Good post.

And don’t even get me started on “paninis” because I’m going to cry

Fun fact: pepperoni pizza wasn’t invented in Italy. The only pizza flavour invented in Italy was the margherita. Most of the others were invented in the US.

Funnier fact: Italy has actually invented a lot of pizza flavours in addition to the margherita (marinara, quattro formaggi, capricciosa, diavola, contadina, tonno, acciughe, principessa, just to name a very few).

What the US has “invented” is simply not regarded as pizza at all, in Italy.

I’d like to suggest a better title: “What happens when you don’t bother checking the meaning of foreign words”.

What the US calls “pepperoni” is actually salame (“salami” is a wrong spelling, panini is the plural of panino). This is what real peperoni (singular peperone) look like. They come in different shapes and colours and have so many beneficial properties that I’d need more pages than the whole asoiaf saga to describe them. Especially since they change depending on the colour of the pepeone. Salame is seasoned salted meat and fat (usually pork). It can be hot/spicy or not. It can also be spreadable, like the ‘nduja from Calabria (Wikipedia calls it a sausage, but it’s salame). It obviously is not as healthy as peperoni (no double p). The plural of pizza is pizze as much as the plural of neko is neko

Another thing I usually hear a lot about pizza abroad is that they replace mozzarella with cheese, which are two completely different things. A pizza with cheese (formaggio) is not a Margherita anymore, for example. There are a lot of pizza types that involve cheese of different kinds and a lot of pizza types that involve mozzarella of different types (mozzarella di bufala, for example). Mozzarella di bufala is a DOP product: it’s unique because of the place it’s produced in, the raw materials used and the way they are obtained (the bufale are bred in specific ways and fed specific and controlled food), the methods used to produce it and so on. 

We invented pizza bianca, which you can either fill with ingredients on the inside or use as a base to put stuff upon, like the pizza boscaiola (mushrooms, mozzarella and sausage; no tomato). We invented pizza al taglio, which is hard to find even in Italy itself, depending on the city you’re in.

But that’s not the problem. I don’t care about who invented what, I don’t care if Italy invented pizza, pasta, gelato or limoncello. It’s about the process. It’s about using good ingredients. It’s about making a good dough that doesn’t taste like fucking rubber when you chew it. Or pizza that has been drowned in oil (ugh). It’s also about respecting another culture, because you should never feel entitled to say “I know this better than you even though your culture has been making it for hundreds of years”. Especially since this whole attitude towards Italian food damages our economy. And is just generally disrespectful. You can put whatever the hell you want on your pizza (in the limits of decency), just be conscious of what pizza really is. Like, have a taste of regular pizza before you go around yelling that [pizza with weird ingredients whose name is probably misspelled] is the one and only.

This is the place where if you speak a different language than your own it’s “appropriation”, but if you try to talk about Italian food (which, newsflash, is deeply rooted in our culture and history) “the US invented more flavours”. We can be better than this.

halleluyang

ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via

The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.

Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.

In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.

babybirch

Song After Sadness by Katie Ford

kathleenjoy:

Despair is still servant
to the violet and wild ongoings
of bone. You, remember, are
that which must be made
servant only to salt, only
to the watery acre that is the body
of the beloved, only to the child
leaning forward into
the exhibit of birches
the forest has made of bronze light
and snow. Even as the day kneels
forward, the oceans and strung garnets, too,
kneel, they are all kneeling,
the city, the goat, the lime tree
and mother, the fearful doctor,
kneeling. Don’t say it’s the beautiful
I praise. I praise the human,
gutted and rising.

milkcustard
micdotcom:

Firefighter Danae Mines just broke through one of the FDNY’s most hallowed glass ceilings

New York City firefighter Danae Mines is the first woman to appear in the FDNY’s annual Calendar of Heroes, which features different firefighters in various locations for each month of the year.
The calendar is notorious for its photos of shirtless male firefighters; its yearly release is usually met with applause and long lines of people waiting to snag copies.
Why she’s a rarity in the FDNY

micdotcom:

Firefighter Danae Mines just broke through one of the FDNY’s most hallowed glass ceilings

New York City firefighter Danae Mines is the first woman to appear in the FDNY’s annual Calendar of Heroes, which features different firefighters in various locations for each month of the year.

The calendar is notorious for its photos of shirtless male firefighters; its yearly release is usually met with applause and long lines of people waiting to snag copies.

Why she’s a rarity in the FDNY